Plante acvariu 1

Cu urmatoarele plante am inceput ciclarea in acvariul 1, resetat.

HETERANTHERA ZOSTERIFOLIA

Hardiness: Easy
Light Needs: Medium
Plant Structure: Stem
Family: Pontederiaceae
Genus: Heteranthera
Region: Central/South America
Location: Brazil
Size: Individual stem width: 5-12cm (2-5in)
Growth Rate: Fast
Can Be Grown Emersed: Yes

Heteranthera zosterifolia, often called stargrass, is a native of Brazil where it grows in still water and in marshy areas. This fragile, soft-leaved plant is now relatively common in the aquatic plant hobby.

H. zosterifolia is relatively easy to grow and an excellent indicator of aquarium conditions. Although it can be grown in lower light (down to 1.75 watts per gallon with power compact bulbs) and non-CO2 conditions, it really does show its full potential under high light and pressurized CO2 injection with leaf size becoming larger and internode length shortening. Small, stunted growth under high light is usually the result of too lean nutrient conditions, as this is a very macronutrient hungry plant (NO3 of 10 ppm or more and PO4 of 1 ppm or more for exceptionally large, lush growth). It reacts to a sudden lack of nitrate by turning transparent and melting away. Phosphate deficiencies result in very dark green, compact plants. Iron and micronutrient deficiencies result in white creases or black edging on the leaves.

H. zosterifolia is a very maleable plant, responding well to pruning the tops off and leaving the rooted portions. With this treatment, stargrass produces a profusion of new side shoots which results in very dense, bushy growth. If allowed to grow along the surface, the plant often produces beautiful blue flowers.

This plant is popularly used in both Dutch and Nature Aquarium style layouts and for good reason. It is often pruned short as a foreground plant, allowed to grow tall as a background plant, or pruned as a midground hedge or street. It is a highly recommended, aesthetically pleasing plant for the aquascape.

HYDROCOTYLE VERTICILLATA

Hardiness: Moderate
Light Needs: High
Plant Structure: Rhizome
Family: Apiaceae
Genus: Hydrocotyle
Region: Americas
Location: North and South America
Size: 3-7 cm (1-3in)
Growth Rate: Medium
Can Be Grown Emersed: Yes

Hydrocotyle verticillata is a common weed found throughout the warmer regions of the Americas, growing in areas ranging from poorly-drained soils to shallow water. It differs from the more commonly available H. leucocephala in that the leaves are entire (like a miniature parasol) and not incised (cut) at the base. There seem to be many H. verticillata look-a-likes in the trade that grow significantly taller. The true H. verticillata is uncommon in the U.S. trade, although both Tropica and Oriental Aquariums grow it.

H. verticillata is not too difficult to maintain in the aquarium. The most important factor is lighting, as the height of this plant will be determined by lighting intensity. The stronger the lighting, the shorter this plant will be. Otherwise, this plant is not too fussy about CO2 or fertilization, although a well balanced nutrient regime and CO2 injection do greatly enhance growth and overall health.

This interesting little plant, unlike H. leucocephala, retains its trailing growth habit when submersed. When first planting, cut the runners into segments that include one leaf. Plant the runners horizontally into the substrate. Soon, this Hydrocotyle will begin to put out new runners. Control it by cutting unwanted runner segments with a sharp pair of scissors.

Because of its unique, umbrella-like leaves and short height, H. verticillata makes a charming foreground accent plant where the leaves look like miniature, green toadstools or mushrooms. In larger aquariums, it can be used as the main foreground plant in place of more typical species like Glossostigma elatinoides, Eleocharis spp., and Riccia fluitans.

ROTALA ROTUNDIFOLIA

Synonyms: Rotala indica (erroneous)
Hardiness: Easy
Light Needs: Medium
Plant Structure: Stem
Family: Lythraceae
Genus: Rotala
Region: Asia
Location: Southeast Asia
Size: Individual stem width: 1.5-2cm (0.75-1in)
Growth Rate: Fast
Can Be Grown Emersed: Yes

Rotala rotundifolia is a classic aquarium plant. While its origins are in southeast Asia, where it grows as a weed in rice paddies and wet soils, it now can be found through many parts of the United States. In the U.S., it was introduced with rice seeds shipped to the southeastern United States. This plant can be differentiated from the closely related R. indica by the differences in the two species’ inflorescences. R. rotundifolia bears groups of terminal inflorescence while R. indica has solitary flowers on the axis of the leaves. R. rotundifolia is now one of the most commonly available aquarium plants available through online venders as well as many local fish stores, although it is still frequently sold in error as R. indica .

R. rotundifolia is an easy red plant to grow in the aquarium. While it will grow in medium light, this plant really needs high light to show its true colors. When lit well, the plant will grow at an angle over the substrate instead of straight up. To encourage red coloration, R. rotundifolia should be kept well lit (2.5 watts per gallon or more) with no shading. Lean nitrate levels (~5 ppm), high phosphate levels (~1.5-2 ppm), and heavy iron/micronutrients dosing will help produce intense colors out of this plant. By varying these conditions, one is able to bring out various shades from pink to yellow.

To propagate, simply snip off a healthy stem and replant into the substrate. Pruning off the top portions of this plant and leaving the rooted portions in the substrate promotes very bushy growth as the plant should produce a multitude of side shoots. Pruning can also be done by discarding the rooted portions and planting the top portions into the substrate. If allowed to grow on the surface, the plant will also produce many side shoots from each node along the stem.

In aquascaping, this versatile plant can be used in the midground and background positions as a focal point or reddish accent. It is commonly used in both Nature Aquarium style and Dutch style layouts.

LUDWIGIA REPENS

Hardiness: Easy
Light Needs: Medium
Plant Structure: Stem
Family: Onagraceae
Genus: Ludwigia
Region: North America
Location: Southern North America
Size: Individual stem width: 5-8 cm(2-3in)
Growth Rate: Fast
Can Be Grown Emersed: Yes

Ludwigia repens, a classic aquarium plant, grows along the margins of any freshwater body of water (ditches, rivers, lakes, ponds) in the southern United States, Central America, and the Caribbean Islands. In the wild, it is a very polymorphic species in that it readily crosses with other species of its genus. This characteristic makes identification between geographical varieties difficult. L. repens is now one of the most commonly available aquarium plants around the world.

L. repens is one of the easiest red plants to grow in the aquarium, being able to grow in even lower light conditions (down to 1.75 watts per gallon with power compacts). It also makes an excellent candidate for moderately lit, non-CO2 aquaria. When lit well, the plant will grow at an angle over the substrate instead of straight up. To encourage red coloration, L. repens should be kept well lit (2.5 watts per gallon or more) with no shading. Lean nitrate levels (~5 ppm), high phosphate levels (~1.5-2 ppm), and heavy iron/micronutrients dosing will help produce intense colors out of this plant. Some hobbyists have noted that 9325K plant bulbs will also enhance red coloration.

To propagate, simply snip off a healthy stem and replant into the substrate. Pruning off the top portions of this plant and leaving the rooted portions in the substrate promotes very bushy growth as the plant should produce a multitude of side shoots. Pruning can also be done by discarding the rooted portions and planting the top portions into the substrate. If allowed to grow on the surface, the plant will also produce many side shoots from each node along the stem.

In aquascaping, this versatile plant can be used in the midground and background positions as a focal point or reddish accent. With intense pruning, the plant can even be used as a foreground plant in large aquaria.

BLYXA JAPONICA

Hardiness: Moderate
Light Needs: Medium
Plant Structure: Stem
Family: Hydrocharitaceae
Genus: Blyxa
Region: Asia
Location: Tropical Asia
Size: Height: 7-15cm (3-6in)
Growth Rate: Medium
Can Be Grown Emersed: No

CRYPTOCORYNE WENDTII ‘GREEN GECKO’

Hardiness: Very Easy
Light Needs: Low
Plant Structure: Rosette
Family: Araceae
Genus: Cryptocoryne
Region: Cultivar
Location: Cultivar
Size: Height: 10-15cm (4-6 in)
Growth Rate: Slow
Can Be Grown Emersed: Yes

Cryptocoryne wendtii ”green” is suitable for small aquariums. When grown in an open space the leaves will virtually lie on the bottom. Like most other Sri Lanka Cryptocorynes, it also grows well in hard water. Like many other plants, it can be affected by cryptocoryne disease. One way to prevent this is by only leaving the 4-5 newest leaves on the plant when planting. It is a good foreground plant, even in small aquariums.

MICROSORUM PTEROPUS ‘WINDELOV’

Hardiness: Very Easy
Light Needs: Low
Plant Structure: Moss / Fern
Family: Polypodiaceae
Genus: Microsorum
Region: Cultivar
Location: Cultivar
Size: Height: 10-20 cm (4-8 in)
Growth Rate: Slow
Can Be Grown Emersed: Yes

Microsorum pteropus ‘Windeløv’ is a patented variety of Microsorum pteropus, named after Tropica’s founder Holger Windeløv. Its finely branched leaf tips make it one of the most beautiful aquarium plants. A hardy and easy plant for both beginners and the more experienced. Best results are obtained by planting it on a stone or tree root. If planted in the bottom the horizontal rhizome must not be covered. This plant is not eaten by herbivorous fish.

SAGITTARIA SUBULATA

Hardiness: Easy
Light Needs: Medium
Plant Structure: Rosette
Family: Alismataceae
Genus: Sagittaria
Region: North America
Location: Eastern United States
Size: Height: 5-15cm (4-6in)
Growth Rate: Fast
Can Be Grown Emersed: Yes

Sagittaria subulata, a marsh plant, is found in the Eastern U.S. and South America in both fresh water and brackish locations. S. subulata is a well-known, popular aquarium plant which is currently cultivated by most major nurseries including Oriental Aquariums, Tropica, and Florida Aquatic Nurseries. Sagittaria subulata is readily available in well-stocked stores listed usually as ‘Dwarf Sagittaria’.

S. subulata is a fairly easy plant to grow, requiring only moderate light. This plant species can tolerate quite hard, alkaline water conditions. Also, this plant species does well in non-CO2 aquaria, although CO2 injection does greatly enhance growth. Either a rich substrate or rich water column with ample amounts of phosphate, nitrate, potassium, and iron/micronutrients will produce the best results. This plant is especially finicky about iron levels and will show deficiencies with yellowing leaves. Intense lighting will bring out reddish leaf apexes.

Planted densely, the 0.5cm wide leaves have the ability to grow to 60cm. Less dense plantings keeps the leaves short, in the 5-10cm range. S. subulata is a fast grower, and as it propagates by runners, it can quickly form a dense carpet. Sometimes, this plant will send long flower stems to the surface which bear small white flowers.

The relatively short height of this plant makes S. subulata ideal for foreground or midground locations or in dense plantings. This grassy textured plant can also be accented with other plant species such as Anubias barteri var. nana and Glossostigma elatinoides for contrast and a more natural appearance. If allowed to grow up to 60cm, then it can be used in the background to create vertical strokes in a layout.

EGERIA DENSA

Hardiness: Very Easy
Light Needs: Medium
Plant Structure: Stem
Family: Hydrocharitaceae
Genus: Egeria
Region: Central/South America
Location: Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay; introduced to other continents
Size: Individual stem width: 3-7 cm (1-2.5 in)
Growth Rate: Very fast
Can Be Grown Emersed: No

Egeria densa, as probably one of the most popular aquarium and pond plants of all time, has also been known as Anachris, Brazilian Elodea, and sometimes as simply Elodea, a name stemming from its previous classification in the genus. Though this species has been introduced into bodies of water on every continent except for Antarctica, its natural distribution is comprised of only parts of Brazil, Uruguay and Argentina. It can be found growing in deep, stagnant or slow-moving bodies of water, and it is readily available in quantity far and wide.

E. densa is among the most easily grown aquatic plants offered for sale today. It will grow either floating or anchored in the substrate at a rate which, if it finds the ambient conditions to be agreeable, is emphatically rapid. This fact lends to its use as an efficient oxygenating agent in both ponds and aquaria. Though hard, lime-rich water and lower temperatures are favored most, this species can endure higher temperatures for a short period of time and growth is only marginally slowed by softer water. CO2 will unquestionably boost the growth rate of this species even though otherwise it could still be described as epidemic. In ponds during the summer, this species will often develop its characteristic white, three-petal flowers. It should also be noted that this species is an effective user of bicarbonate.

Propagation of E. densa is straightforward and trouble-free. All the aquarist needs to do if he or she desires more plants is to sever the top section a the stem and replant it. The bottom portion of the severed stem will soon develop lateral shoots. In floating plants, lateral shoots are far more common and can be cut from the main stem. They will soon spread.

The use of this plant in the aquascape is admittedly limited due to its rapid growth and aversion toward higher temperatures. Nonetheless, if the aquarist is shrewd in his or her pruning practices, an effective backdrop can be rendered with this species. With its deep green color and semi-translucent leaves (they are only two cell layers thick), this species can lend a distinctive texture to the home aquarium.

Young plants initially start with a seedling stem with roots growing in mud at the bottom of the water; further adventitious roots are produced at intervals along the stem, which may hang free in the water or anchor into the bottom. It grows indefinitely at the stem tips, and single specimens may reach lengths of 3 m or more.

The leaves are bright green, translucent, oblong, 6-17 mm long and 1-4 mm broad, borne in whorls of three (rarely two or four) round the stem. It lives entirely underwater, the only exception being the small white or pale purple flowers which float at the surface and are attached to the plant by delicate stalks.

It is dioecious, with male and female flowers on different plants. The flowers have three small white petals; male flowers have 4.5-5 mm petals and nine stamens, female flowers have 2-3 mm petals and three fused carpels. The fruit is an ovoid capsule, about 6 mm long containing several seeds that ripen underwater. The seeds are 4-5 mm long, fusiform, glabrous (round), and narrowly cylindrical. It flowers from May to October.

It grows rapidly in favorable conditions and can choke shallow ponds, canals, and the margins of some slow-flowing rivers. It requires summer water temperatures of 10-25 °C and moderate to bright lighting.

It is closely related to Elodea nuttallii, which generally has narrower leaves under 2 mm broad. It is usually fairly easy to distinguish from its relatives, like the Brazilian Egeria densa and Hydrilla verticillata. These all have leaves in whorls around the stem; however, Elodea usually has three leaves per whorl, whereas Egeria and Hydrilla usually have four or more leaves per whorl. Egeria densa is also a larger, bushier plant with longer leaves.

GLOSSOSTIGMA ELATINOIDES

Hardiness: Moderate
Light Needs: High
Plant Structure: Stem
Family: Phrymaceae
Genus: Glossostigma
Region: Australasia
Location: Australia
Size: 2-3 cm (1-1.5in)
Growth Rate: Fast
Can Be Grown Emersed: Yes

Glossostigma elatinoides, one of the smaller aquarium plants, is a prostrate herb that can be found growing in swamps and inundated areas in Australia. It can be distinguished from the closely related G. diandrum in that it has four stamens within the flower instead of two. In the 1980s, Takashi Amano discovered this (then) uncommon, unpopular plant while reading an issue of European Aquarium Style Magazine. He imported the plant into Japan through the nursery Dennerle. With these imported specimens, he created the first Nature Aquariums with low-growing carpets of Glossostigma. Now, G. elatinoides is one of the most popular foreground plants in the world.

This small aquarium plant is fairly easy to grow in aquariums with decent lighting and CO2 injection. When lit well (at least 2 watts per gallon with power compact lighting, preferably more) and planted well (see below), this plant will respond by quickly carpeting an aquarium with prostrate runners. When poorly lit, G. elatinoides will respond by growing upright. For fastest growth and vigor, this plant prefers regular additions of nitrate (5 ppm or more), phosphate (0.5 ppm or more), and iron into the water column. This plant will respond to low nitrate by yellowing and prematurely losing its older leaves. Phosphate limited situations will result in slow growth and a dark green color. When it is not getting enough iron and traces, transparent patches will appear on the leaves.

When one first receives it, Glossostigma is usually in its emersed form. Plant the stems in groups of three to four and allow two weeks for new submersed growth. Pull out the bunches and snip off the submersed growth with a pair of scissors. Take a stem with a pair of tweezers and run it horizontally under the substrate until it is completely buried. Clear away some substrate until a couple green leaves are visible. The plant should begin to grow horizontally and cover the foreground in a matter of weeks if well lit, provided with ample CO2, and nutrients.

G. elatinoides is usually planted in the foreground where it forms a low growing, dense carpet typically in Nature Aquarium/Amano style layouts. This plant can also be used as a foreground accent. Individual runners form excellent larger leaved accents when growing along a Riccia foreground.

HYGROPHILA POLYSPERMA

Hardiness: Very Easy
Light Needs: Low
Plant Structure: Stem
Family: Acanthaceae
Genus: Hygrophila
Region: Asia
Location: India, Bhutan
Size: Individual stem width: 8-15cm (3-6in)
Growth Rate: Very fast
Can Be Grown Emersed: Yes

The stout Hygrophila polysperma is by and large a universal aquarium plant that is easily acquired. It has been a part of the aquarium plant hobby for many years due to its uncomplicated nature. This tough plant can be found growing predominantly in India and Bhutan.

Few aquatic plant species are as tough or as accommodating as this one. Light intensity seems to be rather unimportant, though lower light values will result in proportionately slower and more diminutive growth. Fertilization, as well, seems to be of limited significance in the maintenance of this species. Its stems will tolerate a variety of hardness values without showing a noteworthy decline in their exceptionally quick growth. CO2 supplementation is definitely not a necessity for this species, and it can be grown in non-CO2 aquaria without problems. In this light, it is a recommendable beginner’s plant.

Since H. polysperma develops a multitude of lateral shoots at its leaf nodes, propagation is a simple matter of removing these and replanting them. An aquarist might also “top” the stems by removing and discarding all of the shoot apexes that rise above a given level in the aquarium; new growth will shortly materialize. The growth of this species is often so rapid that a trim of some sort is required within two or three weeks of the last pruning.

A group of stems of H. polysperma is best suited to the midground area of the aquarium, where they will add an interesting geometry to the aquascape. They are of limited contrast value, making them excellent ‘filler’ plants in stem plant dominated layouts. Although most hobbyists discount the decorative value of this species, Takashi Amano frequently uses this plant in his layouts.

CRYPTOCORYNE PONTEDERIIFOLIA

Hardiness: Easy
Light Needs: Low
Plant Structure: Rosette
Family: Araceae
Genus: Cryptocoryne
Region: Asia
Location: Sumatra
Size: Height: 5-12
Growth Rate: Slow
Can Be Grown Emersed: Yes

Cryptocoryne pontederiifolia is a marsh plant found only on the western coast of Sumatra, one of the largest islands in the Indonesian Archipelago. This plant is also naturalized in Singapore, where it can be found in marshy soils along forest streams. It can be differentiated from the similar C. moehlmannii by the sulfur yellow inflorescence. Although still uncommon in the United States, C. pontederiifolia has long been popularly cultivated by hobbyists in Europe.

This robust Cryptocoryne sp. is unproblematic and adaptable in aquarium culture. Water conditions can range from soft to hard and from weakly acid to neutral. CO2 injection and intense lighting will cause the plant to become bushier and more compact while moderate to dim lighting will result in leggier, taller ones.

When first introduced into an aquarium, this plant will require several weeks of adaptation before growing commences. Afterward, growth is moderate to rapid. Unlike most Cryptocorynes, this species rarely suffers from ‘melting.’ Propagation can be done by splitting the daughter plants, formed by runners, from the mother plants.

The broad, textured leaves of C. pontederiifolia make it an excellent choice for the midground to background of medium to large aquariums where they can be used as an alternative to Anubias spp. It is occasionally used to form Dutch streets in large aquaria in Europe. It is also very attractive in the midground of Nature Aquarium style aquascapes among dark mosses and grassy plants. In medium size aquariums, this plant can also be used as a specimen plant.

LUDWIGIA PALUSTRIS

Hardiness: Easy
Light Needs: Medium
Plant Structure: Stem
Family: Onagraceae
Genus: Ludwigia
Region: Cosmopolitan
Location: Americas, North Africa, Europe, Asia
Size: Stem width: 4-7cm (1.5-3in)
Growth Rate: Fast
Can Be Grown Emersed: Yes

Ludwigia palustris, as its name implies, can be found chiefly in palustrine (swampy) environments across the globe (excluding Australasia). This extremely variable species can be found growing creeping and submersed in shallow pools and other types of stagnant and/or slow-moving waters. It has been regularly available for many years, sometimes as ‘Red Ludwigia’ and sometimes erroneously as L. mullertii (a name under which the venerable L. repens has also been cultivated). However, in recent years, it has become increasingly common (and is now the rule more so than the exception) for plants offered for sale as ‘Red Ludwigia’ to be the cultivar L. palustris x L. repens instead of pure L. palustris. This is also the case, unfortunately, for many of the plants actually offered for sale as the genuine L. palustris. A variety of this species that always remains green is sold by the German plant nursery Dennerle.

The main element required to encourage the satisfactory growth of L. palustris in the aquarium is sufficient light. Although medium values are tolerated, only high light will prevent the plant from becoming leggy and greenish. Macronutrient fertilizers, particularly nitrate and phosphate, are much appreciated by this species despite the fact that it will grow without them. Micronutrient and CO2 fertilization are also not required, but their inclusion will enhance both color and growth. Also, unlike many plants native to temperate areas, L. palustris is quite adaptable to varying temperatures and has no difficulty growing in warmer water. Under high light values, the stems of this species tend to grow at an angle, especially if the substrate is rich. Many roots and lateral shoots will form on the nodes of this plant. In cultivation outdoors in ponds or tubs, L. palustris will produce flowers with four green sepals (no petals) and four yellow stamens. The flower of this species is frequently the characteristic that most easily sets it apart from other species in the Ludwigia genus, though even this can sometimes be problematic because it is possible for L. palustris x L. repens to produce the same flower. Despite this fact, L. palustris can sometimes be differentiated from L. repens and L. palustris x L. repens on the basis of its comparatively longer petioles (the thin section connecting the leaf to the stem). Also, plants with reddish leaf edges, stems, and/or central veins are usually L. palustris, though some varieties of L. repens have been shown to possess similar characteristics.

The topping method of pruning a stem and replanting the severed portion is a good way to propagate this species, since a multitude of new shoots will soon develop on the nodes of the section left in the substrate.

Although the use of this species in the aquascape greatly depends on what color form is being cultivated by the aquarist, the reddish form (which is by far the most common) is the most decorative. That said, the shoots of this species form an excellent eye-catching focus if planted in a graduated or tiered group in the middle zone of the aquarium, where they will contrast best with light and dark green species with fine leaves.

ELEOCHARIS PARVULA

A low-growing Eleocharis that forms runners close to the parent plant. It is prettiest planted in small bunches quite close to each other, which will gradually form a solid mass of plants. An ideal foreground plant, equally suited to large and small aquariums. Its scientific name is at present uncertain.

HEMIANTHUS CALLITRICHOIDES “CUBA”

Hardiness: Moderate
Light Needs: High
Plant Structure: Stem
Family: Scrophulariaceae
Genus: Hemianthus
Region: Central/South America
Location: Greater Antilles (Cuba, Hispaniola, Jamaica, Puerto Rico), Bahamas
Size: Individual stem width: 0.5cm (0.25in)
Growth Rate: Medium
Can Be Grown Emersed: Yes

Hemianthus callitrichoides, sometimes known as ‘dwarf baby tears’, or more commonly as ‘HC’, was discovered by Tropica founder Holger Windeløv during an expedition to a small rocky steam east of Havana, Cuba; it was described in aquaristic literature for the first time in 2003. Since its introduction into the hobby, H. callitrichoides has become increasingly popular and a foreground plant of choice, making this once rare plant moderately easy to obtain.

H. callitrichoides is generally moderate to slow growing in the aquarium. It requires abundant lighting, generous nutrient levels, a fine-grained substrate and good CO2 levels to do well in the aquarium and will respond with a great deal of pearling if those things are provided. Two watts or more per gallon of compact fluorescent lighting or an equivalent light source will keep it growing close to the substrate. A good rule of thumb for this plant is this: The more light and CO2 available, the more the plant will thrive. Flourish Excel is accepted well by this plant and its use will result in noticeable growth improvements. H. callitrichoides can be grown emersed but is somewhat prone to fungal attack if the soil is not thoroughly saturated with water. A rich substrate like Aquasoil and intense lighting are recommended. The plant will flower with tiny white blooms if grown emersed, but the flowers are extremely small and easy to overlook.

In an aquascape, H. callitrichoides is sometimes planted between rocks or over wood to give an aged look. More frequently, it is used as a general foreground cover, often in combination with other foreground plants such as Eleocharis species. Its small size makes it especially useful for nano aquariums. When planting H. callitrichoides, there are two main techniques. The first is to plant small half inch plugs in the substrate at roughly one inch intervals. The second is to carefully plant individual stems close together with a good pair of tweezers (rooting fish will cause stems to be dislodged). There is some debate about which method is best for the fastest coverage, but both work well given good growing conditions.

POGOSTEMON HELFERI

Hardiness: Moderate
Light Needs: Medium
Plant Structure: Stem
Family: Lamiaceae
Genus: Pogostemon
Region: Asia
Location: Thailand
Size: Stem width: 2-5cm (1-2 in)
Growth Rate: Medium
Can Be Grown Emersed: Yes

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